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The List Drugstore Woodwork

woodwork

In 1877, the DuBois Robertson Drug Store was founded in Paducah. The business resided on Broadway and was truly a showplace for those who were patrons of the establishment.

The aspiring owners specified that they wanted an outstanding edifice. Ornate golden oak 'gingerbread' woodwork was designed, carved and installed within the three story building by skilled German artisians. Elaborate stained and beveled glass was also installed on each of the three floors, making the whole a visual masterpiece.

The woodwork took up two of the three floors of the drugstore. A 'flying balcony' extended around the interior, making a soaring ceiling of thirty feet within.

The customers were limited to the first floor, which was a retail establishment. The second floor balcony area was the domain of the proprietors, who sold bulk medicines to other drugstores.

Mr. DuBois and Mr. Robertson parted ways in 1900, with Mr. DuBois remaining with the drug store in its original location until a new building was built for him, more modern, and certainly more practical in scope, in 1905. At that time, the old drugstore was leased to a pharmacist named List. From that time on, even though DuBois owned the building, the drugstore was always called 'the List Drugstore.'

His son, Louis, later became a druggist, and practiced within the confines of the old drugstore until the early 1960’s…when ill health and advanced age helped make the decision to close.

At that time, the granddaughter of Mr. DuBois, a founder of the Market House Museum, donated the interior of the drugstore to the Museum, along with a gift of $10,000 to get the woodwork relocated.

In 1974, a horrendous fire struck the Museum. The gingerbread woodwork was heavily damaged in the disaster. But Museum officials persevered in their restoration efforts, and local master woodworker Charles "Dick" Baucum stepped forward and repaired, restored, or replaced the dainty and delicate woodwork as a labor of love, donated at no cost to the Museum.

After the Museum's rebirth, the original stained glass, ornate cash register, scales, show globes, and unusual patent medicines were also added and been assembled in the current exhibit.


   
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